The Original Honda GoldWing GL1000 - 40 Year Anniversary


In the past 40 years, a friend of my has always owned at least one Honda GoldWing. He started out with a Honda GL1000 in 1977 and, as you might imagine, he’s owned quite a few since then alongside many other types of motorcycle. But there’s something about the original Honda GoldWing which keeps him coming back for more – and that says something significant about Honda’s achievement.

Aimed squarely at America, the Honda GL1000 was so successful that Honda sold more than 25,000 original GoldWings each year in the USA and ended up building the things in America. The Honda GoldWing is a lot like the Range Rover: it’s almost a marque in its own right.

After stealing the scene with the Honda CB750 in the late 1960s, Honda then had to share the spotlight with the superbikes of the early Seventies. The CB struggled to keep up with Kawasaki’s Z1 and couldn’t match the long-distance capability of BMW’s touring twins. So in 1975 Honda introduced a revolutionary motorcycle: pressurized water-cooling, a decade ahead of its time, equipped with an unobtrusive shaft drive that followed – a giant leap forward. And, by the standards of the era, simply gigantic.

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Overrated Turbo Motorcycles from the '80s


I know what you’re thinking: how can you claim the turbo models from the four Japanese manufacturers were ‘overrated’ when nobody actually bought one?

The answer lies partly in the technology, partly in the marketing and partly in the timidity of the manufacturers.

Expectations were high when rumors swirled in the early ‘80s that motorcycles with turbochargers would soon be available. Evidence from the car world suggested these would be giant-killers, with acceleration to make you scared.

At the time, engine development was well ahead of chassis technology and hwat the really powerful motorcycles needed most wasn’t more horsepower but a way of getting the power to the ground. Had turbocharging been patient enough for perimeter-alloy chassis technology to emerge, history may have written differently.

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The Honda Super Cub - The Greatest Bike Ever


At first glance it is hard to believe that the Honda C100 Super Cub would be the greatest bike of all time, because in 1958 almost nobody outside Japan knew the Honda C100 existed. It was simply a domestic market motorcycle. In fact, if you look through the motorcycle press of 1958 and 1959 you will not find a single instance of the name Honda, let alone any mention of a C100 Super Cub.

Instead, in the early years of motorcycling the Brits were the leaders in motorcycle technology, there were features extolling the might of the British industry: 'The new BSA 250 Star' – thoroughly well made, robust and inexpensive.' Motorcycle shows concentrated on Norton, Triumph, Royal Enfield and the rest, as well as a swarm of obscure European manufacturers. Little did they all know a tsunami was on the way.

Honda entered the TT in 1959, winning the Manufacturer's Award after taking sixth, seventh and eleventh. In 1961 Hondas took the top five places in the Lightweight 125 TT, with Mike Hailwood providing their first win.

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Valentino Rossi The Person


Valentino Rossi is a true mercurial talent, sponsor magnet, ageless enthusiasm and a million more characteristics have turned the son of a mid-ranking Grand Prix racer into the Greatest of All Time.

Valentino Rossi approaches his racing in true maverick style, upsetting rivals, undermining competitors and delighting fans in equal measure. But when the visor goes down ice develops in his veins and his racecraft comes into force.

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Movie About Barry Sheene


The wild and crazy life of two-time world champion motorcycle racer Barry Sheene is being developed into a feature-length film by a joint British-Australian film production. Simply titled Sheene, it should be funny, dramatic and exciting film depicting the funny, dramatic and exciting life of the racer.

So far only a teaser video has been released on Youtube. Filming has not yet started, there is no timeline for the film's release and no announcement has been made about who will play the lead character.

Sheene is based on his biography Barry: The Story of Motorcycling Legend Barry Sheene, written by his teammate Steve Parrish and MotoGP commentator Nick Harris. IO Films Australia and Deep Spring Pictures UK are still developing the film with a script from Ian La Frenais and Dick Clement who previously scripted the Commitments, The Bank Job, Flushed Away and Across the Universe as well as TV series Auf Wiedersehen, Pet and Lovejoy.

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The Honda RC166 - 250cc Six-Cylinder Racer


Honda is well known of experimenting with 6-cylinder motorcycles, and even though the mighty Honda CBX1000 is probably the first Honda that comes to mind, be prepared to be amazed by the 250cc Honda RC166 racer. Having won the Grand-Prix championships in 1966 and 1967 with Mike Hailwood in the saddle, the Honda RC166 is truly an impressive machine.

There is so much more to the Honda RC166 than meets the eye, and despite being what is now called a small-displacement machine, the Honda RC166 is a marvel of engineering. Packing enough engine combustion size for that era to make it a wild beast, the engine of this jewel revved close to 20,000 rpm, a feature that is still hard to match nowadays.

If you think that the modern-day motorcycles sound aggressive when revved hard, take your time to listen to the amazing sound of this glorious motorcycle. The Honda RC166 had a seven-speed gearbox, and could easily go faster than 240km/h

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The BMW R90S Daytona Orange - The Real Classic


The BMW R90S, launched in early 1973, changed the general perception of the era that BMW's were unexciting. The first production motorcycle to feature a factory-fitted fairing as standard equipment to make it stand out. Early examples cam in smoke black, and for '76 there was the Daytona Orange. The BMW R90S Daytona Orange even came with hand-painted pinstriping.

The BMW R90S engine was based on the R90/6 touring model, now with a five-speed gearbox. The BMW R90S had higher compression pistons and 38mm Dell'Orto carburetors to crank out its, for that time amazing 67 horsepower.

Also setting the BMW R90S apart were the twin 260mm disc brakes, even if the floating single-piston brake calipers lacked ultimate power.

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Italjet Founder and Ducati Designer - Leopoldo Tartarini


Leopoldo Tartarini, 83, designer of the most iconic Ducati's ever made, including the 1971 750 Sport, the green-frame 750SS street version of Paul Smart's 1972 Imolo 200-winning factory racer, the 350cc and 500cc parallel twins (which were built in his Italjet factory) and the 900cc Darmah V-twins, passed away 11 September, 2015, at his home outside Bologna, Italy.

Tartarini's motorcycle career began at the age of 20 in 1952, when he won the sidecar class in the grueling 18-hour, single-stage Milano-Taranto open-roads marathon riding a BSA 650 Golden Flash outfit he designed and built himself. After a test a Monza, Count Domenico Agusta offered him a place in his MV Agusta factory race team for the 1954 GP season – an honor Tartarini was obliged to refuse after his mother asked him to stay home and manage the family motorcycle dealership in Bologna.

In 1955, Tartarini signed to race with Bologna-based Ducati as a works rider and development engineer working alongside another new arrival, the legendary chief designer, Ing. Fabio Taglioni. A severe injury in 1956 brought Tartarini's racing career to a premature halt, so in 1957 he embarked upon a 13-month long, 59,545 kilometer round-the-world trip publicity stunt with Ducati export sales manager, Giorgio Monetti, riding two 175cc Ducati singles.

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The Cafe Racer - What's Next


Motorcycle enthusiasts are not simple minded one point focused, We're very aware of what's going on in the motorcycle culture at large because any one of us is either in the new wave of motorcycle cool or isn't. This either matters to a person or it doesn't, but I'd say even our apathy is strategic. For the past few years, the Cafe Racer saw a resurgence in the motorcycle zeitgeist. That tide has gone out at this point, but what I think is interesting is not wat's rolling in to replace it (the Scrambler return), but rather what's left behind.

I should clarify that when I say 'Cafe Racer,' I'm using that term as liberally as everyone else does. That is, what used to be fairly narrow type of motorcycle defined by specific criteria and heritage has become an appropriated shorthand for a much wider swath of custom motorcycles, both good and bad, vintage and modern. Ironically, it's only the traditional Cafe Racers that eem to be waning, in what custom builders are putting together and what people are sharing on Instagram and Facebook.

I'm seeing a lot less checkerboard these days, even if the term Cafe Racer endures. The OEMs are like our parents. As soon as they decide something trendy is safe enough to embrace for the mainstream customer, it's probably over. Yesterday's devil music will play softly in the elevators of tomorrow.

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40-years Honda Gold Wing Brand


Today the Honda iconic 'Honda Gold Wing' brand celebrates its 40th anniversary. What was launched as a 1000cc motorcycle back in 1975 has turned into an iconic top of the line touring motorcycle now-a-day.

The Honda Gold Wing has over the years introduced many firsts in the motorcycling world, including an electric reverse and not so long ago the first commercial available airbag system for motorcycles.

From the flat-four engine that powered the Honda Gold Wing GL1000 to the current six-cylinder GL1800A, it has grown and evolved in every sense you can imagine.

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