DEI EXO Series Exhaust Pipe Wrap makes Exhaust Look and Feel Cool


Exhaust systems come in all shapes and sizes. Some come with beautiful heat shields, and others look very basic and uninspiring. Some exhaust systems offer maximum performance right out of the box, while other look good but don’t really do anything.

No matter if you’re looking for freshen up an old set of exhaust pipes or extract maximum performance out of some new ones, exhaust wrap can be a great option. We have an old set of pipes that could use some new life before being mounted up, so we decided to order the latest and greatest in exhaust wrap technology with Design Engineering’s DEI EXO black exhaust wrap.

DEI’s new EXO series exhaust wrap differs fro traditional exhaust wrap tanks to its 304-grade stainless steel exoskeleton is perfect for vehicles with exterior exhaust pipes, like motorcycles, because it provides a high level of abrasion and impact protection to the inner material in addition to the usual heat protection qualities.

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The Denali SoundBOMB Mini - Increase your Horn Volume for Safety


Do you know the feeling that it seems that nobody is hearing you? The Denali SoundBOMB Mini might be small, but it produces a claimed 113 decibels of sound. I fitted the horn to the Yamaha YZF-R3, and the increase in volume compared to the original horn is impressive.

The Denali SoundBOMB horn is quite small and has a stylish look, although you don’t see much of it as it sits neatly between and behind the fairing of the motorcycle in the same place where the original horn used to be.

Instructions are included in the box, but installation is so easy that you might want to skip them. I managed to use the same brackets that were already there, which made things easy. All you need to do is unplug the wires from the old horn, remove it from the bracket, then replace it with the Denali SoundBOMB, attach the screws and plug the wires in.

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The Mitas Sport Force+ Tire - Multi-Purpose Radial Tire


Mitas tires, a name commonly known in the off-road and adventure-bike motorcycle segment. Mitas Tires manufactures and sells tires under three brand names: the companies name Mitas and Cutler and, would you believe it, Continental under license. Mitas has three different production manufacturing locations; in the Czech Republic, Serbia and in the USA.

We were asked to test one of the newest multi-purpose motorcycle tire – the Mitas Sport Force+, claimed to be a new generation of radial tire for riders of sportbikes, naked-bikes, Supermoto / motard and sport touring motorcycles.

The new Mitas Sport Force+ tire is said to be the result of recent development activities, intensive testing and high-end elastomers built into a tire compound. Mitas claim the Sport Force+ boasts superior performance throughout the tire service life by using Strong Carcass Technology (SCT), and that the Mitas Sport Force+ delivers outstanding grip on different road surfaces, temperatures and conditions supported by OGT (3D-Optimum Groove Technology)” ‘Sport Force+ riders will appreciate easy and progressive cornering with maximum control and high-speed stability throughout the tire service life.’

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For 2017, IMU is the Next-Gen in Motorcycle Specs


Not that long ago IMU was a meaningless acronym. Now it’s fast becoming the key tech of 2017. Standing for Inertial Measurement Unit, IMUs are small electronic gizmos that hold the key to a host of next-generation technologies. The first appeared on top-end superbikes but for 2017 the technology is filtering down to much more mainstream models.

Combining accelerometers and gyros, IMUs can measure lean angles and acceleration in various directions – you’ll see them referred to as five-axis, six-axis or even nine-axis IMUs depending on the number of sensors they contain.

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The Kriega Waterproof Messenger Bag


We receive a Kriega Waterproof Messenger bag to review. I’ve been testing it for about a few weeks now and its safe to say the next bag I buy will likely be the Kriega Waterproof Messenger bag. The Kriega Messenger bag has a 16-liter main compartment with a roll-top mouth, a plastic-encased pouch underneath the bag’s flap, and a quick-access side pocket with water-resistant zippers.

It’s also made with durable materials like Cordura, Hypalon and ripstop nylon but still looks stylish enough to wear to work without being mistakes for a sloppy man bag.

Living in Thailand, and at end of the raining season, I’ve had enough opportunities to test how waterproof the Kriega Messenger bag is and it has come up trumps every time. You could almost swim with it. But another standout feature is how comfortable it is on longer rides. The strap, which can be swapped to your right of left side, is padded and contoured so that your shoulder doesn’t hurt when carrying heavy gear, and the quick-adjust buckle makes the bag easy to remove when you’re wearing bulky leathers.

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Motorcycle Disc Brakes Explained


Recently we had a few people asking about brake specifications and if we could explain the differences between different technologies. So we will try to explain a few of the things you can find in motorcycle specification regarding the brake system…

First the floating brake disc. A floating disc is a brake setup wherein the brake disc or rotor is mounted using rivets on a carrier, which, in turn, is mounted on the hub. The carrier enables the brake disc to move parallel to the axis of rotation. The calipers on either side grip the brake disc, so pressure is applied to both sides of the disc.

High performance motorcycles use radially-mounted calipers, which make a difference on track. However, series production motorcycle benefit from the lower weight unit. Performance-oriented motorcycle, from the Benelli TNT300s and KTM 390 Duke to the Kawasaki Ninja ZX-14R and Suzuki GSXR1300 Hayabusa, use floating discs at the front. Conversely, fixed discs are mounted rigidly to the wheel hub and use floating calipers.

For the floating caliper a brake setup moves with respect to the brake rotor or disc, parallel to the axis of rotation to the disc. Pistons on one side of the disc push the inner brake-pad until it makes contact with the surface of the disc, then pulls the caliper body with the outer brake-pad, so pressure is applied to both sides of the disc.

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Local Made Motorcycle Riding Jeans - The Denim Pants that Protects


Being a responsible motorcycle rider dictates that you wear all your riding gear whenever possible. But a pair of riding pants don’t really look cool on the now so popular retro cafe racer, do they?

Nor does sitting in a coffee shop while wearing them or going to work in them. But if your answer was ditching them altogether, think again, for riding jeans are the solution you never realized you needed.

Regular denims are tough as it is, but motorcycle riding jeans are specifically designed to take on a much more severe beating. Infused with materials such as T400 Lycra, 600D fabric and in the premium ones. Kevlar, they provide a superior level of abrasion resistance.

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The Headwave TAG turn your Helmet into an Acoustic Device


If you’re one of those riders who like to spend hours leisurely cruising along highways, listening to music that makes your ride more enjoyable, you may want to keep your eyes peeled for this one. The Headwave TAG is an adhesive acoustic device that is called a Concert Capsule, and fits onto your helmet and literally makes music through vibrations.

Yes, you read that right. It doesn’t have any speakers that you’ll need to stick inside your helmet and slightly change the way it fits. It turns your helmet into a music device and harnesses vibrational energy from an Exciter, which in-turn sends audio waves through your helmet itself, for a rather unconventional surround sound experience.

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What Makes a V4 Engine So Special?


Engine configuration is a compromise, and for a motorcycle it’s a vital one considering its interaction with the rest of the machine – both in terms of package and dynamically. However, there’s clearly more than one way to do it since there are a wide variety of possible motorcycle/engine configurations that work well, with all of their creators claiming that they are the panacea. So let’s think about the advantages and disadvantages of some…

Width is probably the most important dimension regarding how a motorcycle feels, especially for the novice rider. Simple, then: let’s build a single or a V-twin. While this is good for width at the top of the engine, the gearbox is probably the widest part – getting the gears and the clutch on a single shaft dictates this. So a two-cylinder bank probably gives the minimum practical width. And a V-configuration is nearly always more expensive to manufacture than an inline one for any given number of cylinders, too.

Of course wel all like performance, and to generate it more cylinders always helps. This is because for the same capacity and bore/stroke ratio smaller cylinders give a shorter stroke, and this, within mechanical limits, gives the ability to rev. The Honda VFR800F engine has the same bore and stroke of the original 800 from 1998, which shared its bore and architecture with the Honda RVF759R (RC45) superbike, so it can clearly make power.

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Forged Wheels or Cast Wheels


Casting is relatively simple: first you create a mold, then you pour molten metal into it. This only works for simple shapes though. Casting thin sections, for example, is difficult, as the liquid metal cools quickly as it enters these and solidifies before they’re filled.

Forcing the metal in under pressure fills the mold more quickly, giving the metal less time to cool, but this causes bubbles to form.

This is a problem for two reasons. One is that it weakens the metal, so you need more to retain enough strength, and it weighs more. Second, it means you can’t machine the metal very much. Go too deep and you’re into the porous inner, which means you get a much weaker structure and, on a wheel, it might not be airtight either.

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How many times have you crashed your motorcycle in the last three years?

  •  Never
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  •  Twice
  •  Three times
  •  Four times
  •  Five times
  •  More than 6 times
  •  More than 10 times
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