By: TCA (offline)  Saturday, 03 October 2009 @ 02:37 PM ICT (Read 33604 times)  

I'm currently renting a bike by the month but have decided to take the plunge and buy a new machine. I've driven both manual and automatic before, but my other half prefers an automatic so I may go that route, although will consider both. I won't need anything over 150cc. The bike would be used daily for short journeys around town, so mileage would be relatively low with an even mix of both one and two people riding (say 150kg combined), in addition to some occasional shopping on board.

I'm looking at Honda Dream 125, Honda Wave 125i and Honda Click-i Forward but am also getting recommendations for the Yamaha Nouvo 135 Elegance. I've no mechanical knowledge, so some advice would be appreciated. Can anyone recommend any of these (or not) or any others given the above.

Thanks in advance

TCA

   

TCA


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By: Anonymous: Ron ()  Saturday, 03 October 2009 @ 03:57 PM ICT  

I recently went on my 250cc D-Tracker into the hills around Chiang Mai with a friend
on his Nouvo. He came home raving about the bike. I sure kept up with the D-Tracker.
But then he was an ex London courier rider! Laughing Out Loud

By: Anonymous: Ron ()  Saturday, 03 October 2009 @ 03:59 PM ICT  

Should read, "It sure kept up ...."
Wink

By: Richard (offline)  Saturday, 03 October 2009 @ 04:36 PM ICT  

If you prefer an automatic motorcycle, and not want to visit the petrol station too much, you probably best off with one of the latest fuel-injection models.

Currently you have two choices of manufacturer, which offer automatic scooters with fuel-injection. Honda was the first, and mid this year Suzuki came with its own fuel-injection system. The automatic scooters from Honda are powered by a 110cc engine, which is remarkable powerful, but overall they do not match the power of the none-fuel-injection 135cc Yamaha Nouvo Elegance. Suzuki has selected 125cc as the basis of there fuel-injection models, and Suzuki claims that they use a DCP-FI (fuel-injection) system which is not only programmable but also has two state air – fuel system. How it exactly works is for now a well kept secret from Suzuki. Anyway, the new Suzuki's with fuel-injection easily match the power of the 135cc scooters and it is much much more efficient with fuel-consumption, something worth to consider with current fuel prices.

Second benefit of fuel-injection motorcycles, or scooters, is that they much easier adapt to different fuel types. Something an carburetor equipped engine is NOT capable to do. If a carburettor equipped engine is tuned for E20 fuel it will run badly on something like 95 Fuel (and visa-versa). Fuel-injection engines have several sensors to fuel the engine with the exact amount of fuel it needs to run smooth and efficient.

If you have selected which fueling system is good for you, you best scout your area for a motorcycle dealer. For example I like the new Suzuki Skydrive 125, but if the Suzuki dealer is 2 kilometer from my home and Honda is around the corner I will by a Honda Airblade-i, as there is nothing more annoying of pushing a motorcycle/scooter around town (especially when you are a foreigner).

My top 3 of automatic scooters, without considering the distance of the dealer, would be;

1)Suzuki Skydrive 125 or Suzuki Jelato 125
2)Honda AirBlade-i or Honda Click-i
2)Honda Scoopy-i

My top 3 of fuel-injection semi-automatic motorcycles would be;

1)Yamaha Spark RX 135i
2)Honda Wave 125i
3)Honda Wave 110i or Honda CZ-i

The Yamaha Spark RX 135i matches on some levels the performance of the Honda CBR150R, still it looks very common (sort wolf in sheaps clothing)

For the automatics without fuel-injection I would select the following;

1)Yamaha Nouvo Elegance
2)?
3)?

There is not much competition as both Honda and Suzuki are planning to stop the sales of none-fuel-injection motorcycles/scooters.

For none-fuel-injection 4 speed motorcycles with clutch you can also look at the alternative offerings of Tiger Motorcycles, which offers highly reliable 135cc motorcycles. Another alternative which I would consider is the Kawasaki ZX130, which is a very complete 130cc 4-gear motorcycle with even a Tach meter.

   

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By: Richard (offline)  Saturday, 03 October 2009 @ 04:50 PM ICT  

Quote by: Ron

I recently went on my 250cc D-Tracker into the hills around Chiang Mai with a friend
on his Nouvo. He came home raving about the bike. I sure kept up with the D-Tracker.
But then he was an ex London courier rider! Laughing Out Loud



The Kawasaki D-Tracker 250cc is indeed a nice motorcycle for Thailand, another motorcycle in the 250cc range which you could consider is a Tiger Boxer 250RS.

But, if you need to share the motorcycle with other family members or girlfriends I would recommend a underbone type motorcycle or scooter. 250cc motorcycle for family sharing is dangerous, it's asking for accidents.

   

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By: Anonymous: Zero ()  Sunday, 04 October 2009 @ 05:55 AM ICT  

nice info

By: TCA (offline)  Sunday, 04 October 2009 @ 02:36 PM ICT  

Thanks for the replies above, especially Richard's.

I plan to test drive a few this week. My rental bike is a Honda Click Forward (I don't see Click i or PGM-FI anywhere, so not sure if this is an older non-FI model?) and I have to say it's not bad but I feel slightly unsafe at higher speeds in that the steering feels a bit light and wobbly. I'm 85kg and feel that I should be imposing more of my weight forwards to compensate. I guess the weekly shopping in the area between the seat and the steering will do just this and this aspect of the design might actually be something I need, so I'm tending to stray from bikes which don't have this space (the manuals). Poor reason I know.

I wonder though, whether a bike like the Yahama Nouvo Elegance is better in respect of this apparent front end lightness given it appears to have larger front wheels and is a bigger bike? I will have to try one out this week, although for the reasons Richard gives above, fuel injection may be wiser and cheaper. The Suzuki Skydrive 125 looks and sounds good too but I'm not aware of a Suzuki dealership near me, so will have to investigate that point.

   

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By: news (offline)  Sunday, 04 October 2009 @ 07:50 PM ICT  

Not forget that when you buy a non-fuel-injection motorcycle and future bike/scooter models are only available with fuel-injection the value of your older model drops big time.

   

news


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By: TCA (offline)  Tuesday, 13 October 2009 @ 03:56 PM ICT  

Managed to test the Nouvo Elegance 135cc today and was very impressed. I thought it steered and held the road better than the smaller Click that I'm riding at the moment and I definitely felt safer. Braking was good too and it has a fair bit of poke as well.

Pretty sure I'll go for it. My quandry now is that the only place stocking them locally is a small resale garage (almost exclusively Yamaha though) as opposed to the nearest main dealer which is 30mins drive away. Assuming the local place can carry out any necessary repairs and servicing, is there any benefit to buying from a main dealer? Price is the same.

   

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By: Anonymous: Ron ()  Tuesday, 13 October 2009 @ 07:00 PM ICT  

Good choice!
I would definitely go to the main dealer, especially when so near.

By: SUPERENDURO (offline)  Thursday, 15 October 2009 @ 08:04 PM ICT  

Hello!
I am in the same situation, that I am going to get a new tool for my transports around the Island of Phuket 60 km N to S.and about 25km between W & E shores on the widest point.
I am 190cm /100kg's so I want the biggest and most powerfull machine possible with CVT, Alloy Wheels & Storage compartment, I have had my eyes on these scooters:

Yamaha Nouvo Elegance 135
Suzuki SkyDrive 125i
Honda Click-i 110i

Have I missed any bike on the market?

I am NOT in the need for a big bike.


KTM 950 SUPER ENDURO R With Rekluse & Wings
KTM 450 EXC-R "Gettin' Jiggy Wit It" With Rekluse Z-Start Pro & Öhlins SD 2.0
Suzuki KingQuad 700EFI, X-Treme Lift, 27" 589 M/S.
BMW K1200LT

   

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By: news (offline)  Thursday, 15 October 2009 @ 10:37 PM ICT  

Hello Supereduro,

Personally I would "currently" forget about the Yamaha Nouvo Elegance 135, more and more dealers are talking about a upcoming fuel-injection upgrade. The Suzuki Skydrive 125 is surely a good choice. It is very economic on fuel and nows how to perform, it will start under all conditions in Thailand and likely around the world. It will run all fuel as efficient as it is possible.

The Yamaha Elegance 135, while performing well is in daily and future use no match for any other fuel-injection motorcycles. A carburetter motorcycle/scooter is tuned to one fuel, and one fuel only if you full the tank with anything other it is likely to damage the motorcycle's engine, some fuel burn hotter then other fuels. The sensors in a fuel-injection motorcycle/scooter prevent this possible danger of engine problems....

   

news


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By: SUPERENDURO (offline)  Thursday, 15 October 2009 @ 11:16 PM ICT  

Quote by: news

Hello Supereduro,

Personally I would "currently" forget about the Yamaha Nouvo Elegance 135, more and more dealers are talking about a upcoming fuel-injection upgrade. The Suzuki Skydrive 125 is surely a good choice. It is very economic on fuel and nows how to perform, it will start under all conditions in Thailand and likely around the world. It will run all fuel as efficient as it is possible.

The Yamaha Elegance 135, while performing well is in daily and future use no match for any other fuel-injection motorcycles. A carburetter motorcycle/scooter is tuned to one fuel, and one fuel only if you full the tank with anything other it is likely to damage the motorcycle's engine, some fuel burn hotter then other fuels. The sensors in a fuel-injection motorcycle/scooter prevent this possible danger of engine problems....



Is the Skydrive relatively big and does it have a large storage compartment ?
Is it really that hard to find non alcohol fuel in Phuket?
I wish the Yamaha Elegance would have the Spark Fi 4V-engine, then it would be a no brainer...
Why is the Yamaha Spark RX 135i (52K) lower priced than the Yamaha Nouvo Elegance (55K)


KTM 950 SUPER ENDURO R With Rekluse & Wings
KTM 450 EXC-R "Gettin' Jiggy Wit It" With Rekluse Z-Start Pro & Öhlins SD 2.0
Suzuki KingQuad 700EFI, X-Treme Lift, 27" 589 M/S.
BMW K1200LT

   

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By: TCA (offline)  Friday, 16 October 2009 @ 12:00 PM ICT  

Quote by: news

Hello Supereduro,

Personally I would "currently" forget about the Yamaha Nouvo Elegance 135, more and more dealers are talking about a upcoming fuel-injection upgrade. The Suzuki Skydrive 125 is surely a good choice. It is very economic on fuel and nows how to perform, it will start under all conditions in Thailand and likely around the world. It will run all fuel as efficient as it is possible.

The Yamaha Elegance 135, while performing well is in daily and future use no match for any other fuel-injection motorcycles. A carburetter motorcycle/scooter is tuned to one fuel, and one fuel only if you full the tank with anything other it is likely to damage the motorcycle's engine, some fuel burn hotter then other fuels. The sensors in a fuel-injection motorcycle/scooter prevent this possible danger of engine problems....



Jeez, that post has put a dampener on my almost made decision to go for the Yamaha Nouvo Elegance. I also read about an upcoming fuel-injection model but am led to believe this will be far more expensive than the existing model, which is already at the top end of the price range for this level of bike.

Is the fuel aspect in a non-fuel injection engine really such a vital factor, as there appear to be many owners of this bike around? Excuse my ignorance. Do any Nouvo Elegance drivers out there agree with this?

   

TCA


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By: Anonymous: Silvia ()  Friday, 16 October 2009 @ 03:31 PM ICT  

If I look back on how fast the gasoline based 95 fuel was gone, and I cannot run Gasohol 95 in my motorcycle. I would select next time a motorcycle which can run as much fuels as possible, especially with so much changes in fuels coming up.

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