By: Anonymous: Bob ()  Friday, 07 June 2013 @ 01:43 PM ICT (Read 4922 times)  

You don't have to be in an exotic or a remote location to be hours from life-saving medical aid. So, no matter where you ride, be prepared for medical emergencies. The three most important tools weigh nothing and take no luggage space: physical fitness (ability to respond), situational awareness (greater scene safety/actual incident severity) and first-aid/CPR training (knowing what to do). EMT certification is even better.

That said, having equipment is key. Use a dedicated kit bag or heavy, clear Ziploc-type bag easily accessible by you or others. The essentials: 1. Four size-Large non-latex gloves; 2. Blunt-nose scissors to cut clothing/bandages; 3. Tweezers; 4. Steriale gauze pads (10 x 10 cm); 5. Roller bandage (around 10 centimeter wide stretchy gauze); 6. Antiseptic wipe packets/Neosporin; 7. Adhesive cloth or plastic tape; m8. Adhesive bandages (assorted sizes); Surgical/compress dressing (big, absorbent, cuttable); 10. Tongue depressors (finger splints)

Now share this information with your riding partners in case it's you on the ground....

By: fred (offline)  Friday, 07 June 2013 @ 08:34 PM ICT  

Quote by: Bob

You don't have to be in an exotic or a remote location to be hours from life-saving medical aid. So, no matter where you ride, be prepared for medical emergencies. The three most important tools weigh nothing and take no luggage space: physical fitness (ability to respond), situational awareness (greater scene safety/actual incident severity) and first-aid/CPR training (knowing what to do). EMT certification is even better.

That said, having equipment is key. Use a dedicated kit bag or heavy, clear Ziploc-type bag easily accessible by you or others. The essentials: 1. Four size-Large non-latex gloves; 2. Blunt-nose scissors to cut clothing/bandages; 3. Tweezers; 4. Steriale gauze pads (10 x 10 cm); 5. Roller bandage (around 10 centimeter wide stretchy gauze); 6. Antiseptic wipe packets/Neosporin; 7. Adhesive cloth or plastic tape; m8. Adhesive bandages (assorted sizes); Surgical/compress dressing (big, absorbent, cuttable); 10. Tongue depressors (finger splints)

Now share this information with your riding partners in case it's you on the ground....



Very good idea. I have also been in small accidents, going downhill in Koh Chang, just started raining, water+oil not very good combination.
Legs and arms got quite much scratched from the road, since it was going down hill took longer to stop sliding...

luckily there was a pharmacy near by so we could treat the injuries...

some small things what I would add to the list, but can be very useful for smaller accidents.

- Alcohol wipes
- A Water bottle and liquid soap: to clear your wounds, this can make big difference in the healing and stop the Pain..
- Antibacterial/antimicrobial gauzes, for example brand: urgotul (google it and you will see)
it's very useful since it can help your scratches and wounds heal quicker and avoid inflammation from road dirt.

cheers.

   

fred


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By: silenzo (offline)  Saturday, 08 June 2013 @ 08:49 PM ICT  

Quote by: fred

Quote by: Bob

You don't have to be in an exotic or a remote location to be hours from life-saving medical aid. So, no matter where you ride, be prepared for medical emergencies. The three most important tools weigh nothing and take no luggage space: physical fitness (ability to respond), situational awareness (greater scene safety/actual incident severity) and first-aid/CPR training (knowing what to do). EMT certification is even better.

That said, having equipment is key. Use a dedicated kit bag or heavy, clear Ziploc-type bag easily accessible by you or others. The essentials: 1. Four size-Large non-latex gloves; 2. Blunt-nose scissors to cut clothing/bandages; 3. Tweezers; 4. Steriale gauze pads (10 x 10 cm); 5. Roller bandage (around 10 centimeter wide stretchy gauze); 6. Antiseptic wipe packets/Neosporin; 7. Adhesive cloth or plastic tape; m8. Adhesive bandages (assorted sizes); Surgical/compress dressing (big, absorbent, cuttable); 10. Tongue depressors (finger splints)

Now share this information with your riding partners in case it's you on the ground....



Very good idea. I have also been in small accidents, going downhill in Koh Chang, just started raining, water+oil not very good combination.
Legs and arms got quite much scratched from the road, since it was going down hill took longer to stop sliding...

luckily there was a pharmacy near by so we could treat the injuries...

some small things what I would add to the list, but can be very useful for smaller accidents.

- Alcohol wipes
- A Water bottle and liquid soap: to clear your wounds, this can make big difference in the healing and stop the Pain..
- Antibacterial/antimicrobial gauzes, for example brand: urgotul (google it and you will see)
it's very useful since it can help your scratches and wounds heal quicker and avoid inflammation from road dirt.

cheers.



Koh Chang road is quite dangerous in my view for a motorbike. Especially for the inexperience one. I see lot of people ride small bike there without helmet and proper safety gear protection. Not only local but tourist also. Anyway thanks for the tools tip. What is on top of my mind is about the physical fitness and awareness. This 2 combination bring greater goods for joyful bike riding.

   

silenzo


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By: Anonymous: Jeffrey ()  Sunday, 09 June 2013 @ 06:30 AM ICT  

Bob, first off much of what you said for your kit is not available in Thailand and this is a Thailand forum

Second, your wrong. Everywhere in Thailand Medical aid is available and just minutes away. I ride over 100,000 KM a year in Thailand and yes, over the last 13 years have had a few accident. in each case help was there in 5 minutes or less

Just good to know the number to call 1669 is the medical help line

By: silenzo (offline)  Sunday, 09 June 2013 @ 12:12 PM ICT  

Quote by: Jeffrey

Bob, first off much of what you said for your kit is not available in Thailand and this is a Thailand forum

Second, your wrong. Everywhere in Thailand Medical aid is available and just minutes away. I ride over 100,000 KM a year in Thailand and yes, over the last 13 years have had a few accident. in each case help was there in 5 minutes or less

Just good to know the number to call 1669 is the medical help line



Well medical kits can be customised, i think it can be useful if the trip is really out of reach from inhabitant. Anyway, the "1669", do they speak english?

   

silenzo


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By: news (offline)  Sunday, 09 June 2013 @ 02:56 PM ICT  

Quote by: Jeffrey

Bob, first off much of what you said for your kit is not available in Thailand and this is a Thailand forum

Second, your wrong. Everywhere in Thailand Medical aid is available and just minutes away. I ride over 100,000 KM a year in Thailand and yes, over the last 13 years have had a few accident. in each case help was there in 5 minutes or less

Just good to know the number to call 1669 is the medical help line



I'm not sure what is not available in Thailand from the items Bob talks about for a basic medical kit...

   

news


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By: fred (offline)  Sunday, 09 June 2013 @ 07:34 PM ICT  

Quote by: silenzo



Koh Chang road is quite dangerous in my view for a motorbike. Especially for the inexperience one. I see lot of people ride small bike there without helmet and proper safety gear protection. Not only local but tourist also. Anyway thanks for the tools tip. What is on top of my mind is about the physical fitness and awareness. This 2 combination bring greater goods for joyful bike riding.



Yes Koh Chang is just one of the dangerous places, there are others way more dangerous, such as pukhet, bangkok, south thailand where they drive like maniacs. etc.
Of course awareness and experience is the best, but not always you have the luxury of it. In the case of my accident I was not driving, because GF wanted me to take photos... So, the rain just started and just before was going to take the wheel, we hit what looked like an oil deposit on the road going down and the bike slid.. .as well will never let anyone ride instead of me, unless I'm physically unable to do so. I hate renting bikes, because they always have poor brakes and poor tires. If I had a pickup I would take my bike with me.

Also in bangkok a year ago, I slid with the bike for the same exact reason, an Oil deposit on the side roads right in front of a gas station. I was so pissed with the guys at the gas station.
These were only 2 times I ever had accidents in bike many years ago, for 6 years i've been riding bikes. i'm not expert in motorcycle but I got my skills from mountain bike and cross bike competitions as teenager. I can say I've had a few close calls, that those medkits would not help Big Grin

The toolkits are very essentials, even if you are experienced, there is always a chance of small accidents.
those I add are easily available in any drugstore...

Besides as Jeffrey said, there are hospitals and drug stores almost everywhere.

   

fred


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By: Anonymous: Bob ()  Monday, 10 June 2013 @ 01:10 PM ICT  

With any accident every second counts, for instance in a book I have 'First Aid for Backpackers and Campers' they say “If a large blood vessel is cut, a person can bleed to death in one minute or less. Rapid loss of one quart or more of blood often leads to irreversible shock and death. Serious bleeding requires immediate attention and care.”

To many people die in Thailand from road accidents that could be easily avoided by a simple compression bandage, a finger on the wound, or another way to limit the bleeding...

A simple transparent Ziploc bags you can buy at any supermarket in Thailand, the stuff for inside the plastic bag you can buy at any decent pharmacy I bet you can even fill your medical kit bag at a Watson or a Boots shop... I prefer the traditional pharmacy in my neighborhood, the owner seems to know what he's talking about...

By: Anonymous: Jeffrey ()  Saturday, 15 June 2013 @ 07:24 AM ICT  

Lord help us if you need to look in a book at what to do.
Riding around Thailand for the last 13 years, averaging over 100,000km a year, Never has medical care been more than just a few minutes away

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