By: Anonymous: ex-ER6N biker ()  Friday, 30 March 2012 @ 04:39 PM ICT (Read 3558 times)  

168,000 Baht. A bargain, I though, not knowing that I would possess the devil's own motorbike. It was a 2009 Kawasaki ER6N. Money changed hands and I was left with an immaculate motorcycle and a grin that reached from ear to ear. That grin was very short-lived, however, as one of my friends (with more motorcycling experience than me) parked it into a concrete lamppost at speed, putting himself in the hospital and, more importantly, writing-off my new pride and joy. All within four hours of my official ownership. I might add.

I spent my nights slaving away in my poorly lighted and ventilated shack, relentlessly getting my Kawasaki ER6N back into a ride-able state, with no money from insurance, no money from the hospitalized friend; working extra hours just to hear the engine roar into life once again. So there I stood, four months later, minus a good amount of money and without girlfriend pressing that starter button. I had my dream motorcycle back and full-face smile appeared once again.

The devil intervened again and, after just a few months of happy biking, I catastrophically blew a conrod through the side of the engine, simultaneously coating my tires with oil and filling my pants with the brown slipper stuff. That was it, I'd had enough of this motorbike... I sold it.

With all repairs it should have been cheaper if I bought a brand new Kawasaki ER6N at the dealer, that would have been accompanied with 1-year all-risk insurance...

By: news (offline)  Friday, 30 March 2012 @ 05:01 PM ICT  

They say “it's good to have friends”, but, friends that destroy your motorcycle within a few hours you can surely do without.

   

news


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By: Anonymous: SD ()  Saturday, 31 March 2012 @ 06:45 PM ICT  

Quote by: ex-ER6N biker

168,000 Baht. A bargain, I though, not knowing that I would possess the devil's own motorbike. It was a 2009 Kawasaki ER6N. Money changed hands and I was left with an immaculate motorcycle and a grin that reached from ear to ear. That grin was very short-lived, however, as one of my friends (with more motorcycling experience than me) parked it into a concrete lamppost at speed, putting himself in the hospital and, more importantly, writing-off my new pride and joy. All within four hours of my official ownership. I might add.

I spent my nights slaving away in my poorly lighted and ventilated shack, relentlessly getting my Kawasaki ER6N back into a ride-able state, with no money from insurance, no money from the hospitalized friend; working extra hours just to hear the engine roar into life once again. So there I stood, four months later, minus a good amount of money and without girlfriend pressing that starter button. I had my dream motorcycle back and full-face smile appeared once again.

The devil intervened again and, after just a few months of happy biking, I catastrophically blew a conrod through the side of the engine, simultaneously coating my tires with oil and filling my pants with the brown slipper stuff. That was it, I'd had enough of this motorbike... I sold it.

With all repairs it should have been cheaper if I bought a brand new Kawasaki ER6N at the dealer, that would have been accompanied with 1-year all-risk insurance...




I never let ANY of my friends ride my bike, unless they have first class insurance (and a good paying job)

Same same goes for me riding their bikes

Nothing like a crashed bike (or car) to sress a friendship

Some things are just not made to "share"


By: Anonymous: Ashley ()  Saturday, 31 March 2012 @ 08:07 PM ICT  

Guy at Leo's Beer Bar in Khon Kaen (I don't live there) was a bit desperate to ride my Ninja 650 a couple weeks back. Said he'd owned two before, and that he was sure I was a good chap, after all, and yada, yada, yada. This at about 2PM. I had no way of knowing how many beers he'd had for breakfast and lunch, but it was clearly several. He was a bit put out when I declined to give him the keys, declaring me persona non grata for the rest of my visit there. I was a bit put out that he could have even asked, of course.

I might (or might not) loan the Mio 115 to someone, though not to a guy who's had uncountable beers for breakfast and lunch.

No one but me gets to ride the Ninja 650, however. While I wouldn't say it was over-powered at all, it does have much, much too much power for a good many people, and I have zero reason to let them use it.

By: Anonymous: Khun P. ()  Saturday, 31 March 2012 @ 10:20 PM ICT  

They say 'borrow' gives 'sorrow', and with lending your motorcycle in Thailand, where not everybody has insurance to cover stupidity, sorrow is often what you're left with if something happens with your motorcycle...

By: Anonymous: David M ()  Saturday, 19 May 2012 @ 11:24 PM ICT  

Never let anyone ride your bike or even drive your car if you do not know that person riding or driving skill..

Even if you do.. make sure he/she (and also you if he/she is not able to afford it) is able to afford a worst case scenario repair/write-off bill..

I am fortunate that I had friends that let me ride their larger capacity cruisers or sports bike.. I had never asked to borrow their bikes but they were willing to lend to me after they seen my riding ability and safety consciousness during a 200km ride with them.. I took my 250cc whilst they took their 600cc to 1400cc.. of course we shake hand on a gentlemen agreement to pay for any damages..

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