By: radnoc (offline)  Friday, 06 May 2011 @ 08:37 PM ICT (Read 5612 times)  

Pre delivery check.
If you are buying a new bike in Thailand. You would be best in assuming this has not been done.
If you cannot do this youself, get a useful friend to do it for you.
Failing that you are in sh1t street, then don't buy.
My experiences,
Rear wheel spacers wrong way around(left to right, chain out of line).
Chain too tight, nasty scrunching noise.
No free play in clutch cable.
Too much play in throttle cable.
Rear brake binding.
Tick over not adjusted.
Carb full of crap(bike in showroom forever).
50 psi in each tyre.
Loose Nuts/bolts
Side stand cut out, that dont..
There's more
Got to stop, this is turning into a rant.
I am lucky, had bikes all my life it seems, i can spot these things.

Anyway, take care, check everything.
Good Luck!

   

radnoc


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By: Anonymous: David ()  Friday, 06 May 2011 @ 11:47 PM ICT  

What bike was it and from where?

By: Anonymous: Chang ()  Saturday, 07 May 2011 @ 09:04 AM ICT  

Unfortunatly you ar so right .... even at the "official dealer" at the service check of my bike the only thing done was change the oil and oil-filter, nothing was checked. So I assume they did also never do a "pre-sale check" that they have to do according to the service manual.

My headlight was set too high and the free-running rpm was too low. They did not even notice it. The psi on my tyres was too low, they did not notice it.

So indeed get yourself a service-manual of your bike and just do it yourself.

Chang Noi

By: ThaiDesign (offline)  Saturday, 07 May 2011 @ 10:24 AM ICT  

Even if you buy one of the popular motorcycle brands, you always have to check the bolts and nuts after a week riding. For tires, I still need to find a motorcycle or even a car dealer who brings the tires to the right pressure (and please don't trust the pressure gauge at the petrol station...).

   

ThaiDesign



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By: Anonymous: rider ()  Saturday, 07 May 2011 @ 01:02 PM ICT  

Quote by: ThaiDesign

Even if you buy one of the popular motorcycle brands, you always have to check the bolts and nuts after a week riding. For tires, I still need to find a motorcycle or even a car dealer who brings the tires to the right pressure (and please don't trust the pressure gauge at the petrol station...).



Absolutely agree, and a PDC doesn't seem standard here. My Yamaha & Honda had both issues , smaller ones but still ( and too tight chain or overinflated tire is the norm it seems )When you get a new Bike/Car either check things self or involve some Mechanic that you know and trust. You will be riding/driving this Vehicle so it is your life .

By: radnoc (offline)  Sunday, 08 May 2011 @ 09:01 PM ICT  

PS.
Another recommendation.
When you take your bike for a service, assume, to be on the safe side(if not a big big dealer), that they have only changed the oil and washed the bike. Looks nice! Get the stamp whatever for the warranty(what warranty).
ThenBig Grino it yourself then you know it's done. Otherwise live in hope.

   

radnoc


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By: news (offline)  Monday, 09 May 2011 @ 10:34 AM ICT  

Even some of the big dealers do not always follow the instructions from the manufacturer. To my experience, Thai mechanics often skip replacing the oil-filter even if the service manual specifies it.

For Thailand I can advice that you inquire what needs to be done, before you go to the garage. And for example if for a 5,000km servicing the oil-filter needs to be replaced, it needs to be replaced – you don't care if the old one looks like new and unused...

   

news


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By: Anonymous: Chang ()  Tuesday, 10 May 2011 @ 09:52 AM ICT  

My experience with the Kawasaki Dealer (big bike) in Pattaya is that they only do things that they can sell.

Another problem is that most Thai people do not want to change a part that still looks good, so the mechanic are getting used to that and think that all people are like that.

Next service-check I will give them a service check list and be standing right next to my bike.

Chang Noi

By: Anonymous: Chaidee ()  Tuesday, 10 May 2011 @ 09:59 AM ICT  

Not forget to tell them you want the old parts back they replaced!!!

By: Anonymous: David ()  Tuesday, 10 May 2011 @ 04:30 PM ICT  

Even though the pre-delivery checks are so slack here (as is so much of the 'servicing'Wink, one good thing is that bike shops don't seem to mind owners overlooking the work that is being done. Or maybe they do, but they usually don't say so!
I overlook everything.

By: Richard (offline)  Tuesday, 10 May 2011 @ 04:58 PM ICT  

Overlooking, is the key, and culture – most Thai's stay to look at work being done – I can remember one of my drivers was really surprise that I just delivered my car to the local BMW dealer and didn't stay until the work was done... He even protested so much that we went back and he stayed and I drove the pickup truck back to the office...

   

Richard


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