By: Anonymous: Skippy ()  Friday, 21 May 2010 @ 06:54 PM ICT (Read 4327 times)  

Last time I was riding in the mountains outside Chiang Rai I was stopped by the police, they told me that the last six people killed in motorcycle crashes in the area were all males over 30 years old. In all but one of the crashes, the motorcycle rider had caused the accident by going too fast.

The two most recent deaths happened when the rider went onto the incorrect side of double lines and hit a car coming the other way.

I was told that the Royal Thai Police recently used an unmarked motorcycle to stop riders in the Chiang Mai area. To those who complained about sneaky police. It's easy slow down and you won't get into problems with the law.

Why am I telling you this? Simple: I like to ride in the Chiang Rai area and I don't want to be hit by some fool going too fast on the wrong side of the road.

By: Warp Racer (offline)  Friday, 18 June 2010 @ 12:50 PM ICT  

Quote by: Skippy

Last time I was riding in the mountains outside Chiang Rai I was stopped by the police, they told me that the last six people killed in motorcycle crashes in the area were all males over 30 years old. In all but one of the crashes, the motorcycle rider had caused the accident by going too fast.

The two most recent deaths happened when the rider went onto the incorrect side of double lines and hit a car coming the other way.

I was told that the Royal Thai Police recently used an unmarked motorcycle to stop riders in the Chiang Mai area. To those who complained about sneaky police. It's easy slow down and you won't get into problems with the law.

Why am I telling you this? Simple: I like to ride in the Chiang Rai area and I don't want to be hit by some fool going too fast on the wrong side of the road.



Hi Skippy,

I just noticed your post and I have to agree with you. Much as I love giving my bike a blast through the hills, I never try and treat the roads like a race track, in the fact where I will cut corners. Too much Middle East riding with idiots driving all over the road with no regards to the consequences of their actions.

Also, on more than one occasion riding the hills I've had the odd scary moment when Mr. Isuzu / Mr. Toyota pickup decides to take the racing line. Hmm let me think about this...200kgs of bike VS 1500kgs of pickup...okay buddy, you can have as much road as you like and have a nice day you prick.

I hope that my road craft has been honed over the years riding in the Middle East, Thailand and in 'very legal, you will lose your license' Australia. Luck still plays an important part and think most of us have been lucky at one time or another, thinking 'how in the hell did I get away with that unscathed?'.

I love my passion and it won't stop me having my fun, but a reality check is always enforced as we aren't on a race track.

Click on image to download

Cheers,

Warp


ONCE YOU'VE HAD ASIAN, YOU WILL NEVER TOUCH CAUCASIAN
OLD AGE AND TREACHERY WILL ALWAYS OVERCOME YOUTH AND ENTHUSIASM

   

Warp Racer


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By: Anonymous: Wasley ()  Monday, 27 December 2010 @ 06:22 PM ICT  

We've all met a couple of those riders and the lesson remains 'You know that rider.... don't be that rider.' I am a humble student of the craft and hope to remain so for as long as I'm in the saddle.

I'm lucky to have experienced riders as mentors and a thumbs up on the road or an encouraging breakdown/debrief of a ride during a stop from them means more to me than the self-inflated kudos of thinking you're the quickest thing since microwaveable pop tarts.

Your sense of motorcycling values is clear here and I'm sure like-minded riders would do well to aspire to them. To you and your team all the best.

By: Matty (offline)  Monday, 27 December 2010 @ 06:52 PM ICT  

Good advice from all the previous writers,
My long passed away uncle told me some good advice when i got my first Road bike(CB750F2 ) I had several bikes before but all motocross or enduro bikes, never a road licenced bike.

He told me NEVER ride fast on an unfamiliar road, Get to know the road first, check the camber of the corners, tightness of the corners, any other dangers that may be around like side roads, T junctions, check out the road surface for grip, pot holes and loose material ( sand or rocks etc. ) check for stray cattle, dogs, pedestrians or any thing else that can cause drama and make you come unstuck.
When you know the road well you can open up the throttle and enjoy the thrill with confidence, knowing your not going around a blind corner with no knoledge of whats instore.

This advice has served me well, with many years of accident free FUN, ( apart from 1 mongrel dog that ran out onto the road, attacked and tried to take a bite out of my front wheel at 70km/h, sending me sliding down the bitumen. But no serious harm done, just 6 stiches and a scar to my stomach, and more importantly a dead dog ) ( that will teach ya..you flea ridden corpse. )

So GOOD ADVICE to all those riding up in the mountains ( or anywhere for that matter ) If you have never ridden these roads before, TAKE IT EASY, DONT BE A HERO. When you know the roads well, ride as fast as you want but SAFELY.

Happy Biking and Happy New Year to ALL...

   

Matty



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By: Warp Racer (offline)  Monday, 27 December 2010 @ 07:16 PM ICT  

Hi guys and Merry Christmas & Happy New Year to one and all.

Matty, sound advice and I am a big fan of carrying out a reccy of unknown roads. I have probably lost count of the amount of times I've ridden on roads unfamiliar to me but familiar to the riders I was with. On all occasions I have clearly stated to them that until I am comfortable with the road / run, I will crack along at my own pace and if they do 'leave me for dead' I will eventually catch up. This is not my total ethic on this, as to me you are only as fast as the slowest rider. A lot of guys aren't used to this process and a more prone to take off and wait for the slow guys to catch up later, which can be disastrous if someone were to come unstuck. Eventually everyone finds a riding group who have a comfortable pace, riding style and attitude to themselves.

Anyway, all the best guys and hope you have plenty of more happy years left of riding on the wonderful roads of (Northern) Thailand.

Cheers,
Garry Thumbup


ONCE YOU'VE HAD ASIAN, YOU WILL NEVER TOUCH CAUCASIAN
OLD AGE AND TREACHERY WILL ALWAYS OVERCOME YOUTH AND ENTHUSIASM

   

Warp Racer


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Level:
: +2
Registered:: 20/05/10

Posts: 9
By: Anonymous: Just watch it! ()  Monday, 27 December 2010 @ 07:41 PM ICT  

Personally, I commence every ride with the self-reminder;

'everyone out there is out to kill you mate. Don't allow them the satisfaction".

ie defensive riding, total concentration, total distrust of everyone else on the roads and total respect of my own well-being.

So far this approach has worked!

By: Anonymous: Mark ()  Tuesday, 28 December 2010 @ 05:53 AM ICT  

I agree with what you say about riding with your buddies, most of the 'tag along buddies' are young fairly inexperienced riders and are just trying to cut it with the big boys and girls.

I was very lucky when I started riding that a couple of older guys took me under their wings, told me to wake up stop acting and riding like an idiot.

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