By: Anonymous: Anton ()  Saturday, 08 May 2010 @ 09:57 PM ICT (Read 10922 times)  

I'm looking to buy a motorcycle in Khon Kaen. I basically need it to get to and from work, I don't do much riding in my free time because of my schedule.


1) Would you recommend getting something second hand or new?

2) What would be a good cruiser model for my purposes?

3) I've looked at the Kawasaki Boss 175 and the Honda Phantom 200. What are your thoughts on these machines?

Any help would be helpful. Thanks.

By: Anonymous: Anton ()  Sunday, 09 May 2010 @ 11:18 PM ICT  

So any news if the Virago is coming or not?

There was a similar thread that I found most helpful and someone posted info about the Virago. Work starts soon and I'd like to have a bike within a month if possible.

I've read enough forums to turn me off on the Phantom, the Kawasaki Boss fits nicely into my budget, but other than those two, I don't know what else I'd want.

The Tiger looked promising, albeit a bit small, maybe that's just the pictures.

I tried out a Tornado the other day, but it just felt too heavy and a bit cheap, for lack of a better word.

I'm seriously debating on getting a used one, but I like having a warranty and a payment plan, even if in the long run I'm paying more.

By: Flying Squirrel (offline)  Monday, 10 May 2010 @ 11:08 PM ICT  

Anton,

How far is your commute? What type of roads? traffic? How important in the grand scheme is fuel economy?

   

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By: Anonymous: Anton ()  Saturday, 15 May 2010 @ 10:28 PM ICT  

My commute is about 10 minutes by bus to one job, 15 to another all on the same bus.

So fuel is not a real issue. I just want something that it not a little twist-and-go. Something I can easily get worked on if needed and something that looks nice. Although nice is a subjective statement.

By: Flying Squirrel (offline)  Monday, 17 May 2010 @ 03:45 PM ICT  

I just want something that it not a little twist-and-go.



PCX will cruise at 120? So I've read.
Tiger G-Max?
Both in the 6x,000-ish range

10 - 15mins commute? Urban assault Bike? Mini superbike?

If you must have new then maybe Tiger Boxer 250RS. Have you been to Kawasaki and looked at the D-Tracker that maybe just the one for you?

Me? D-tracker or used CB400. It's a very personal choice.

Have you joined Gt-Rider? there are lots of guys in Khon Kaen

   

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By: news (offline)  Tuesday, 18 May 2010 @ 08:31 AM ICT  

The choices for real motorcycles, the once who have clutch and gears, are getting rare in Thailand. Currently the most famous motorcycle with gears, still available, is probably the Tiger Boxer 250 RS. The Tiger is a great machine, the engine is simple but powerful enough to impress the biggest critics.

Other motorcycle on offer under the 100,000 Baht range are the Lifan LF200GY-5, or the Zongshen Ryuka Fly 150, and the Kawasaki D-Tracker 125 from the 3 the Lifan is the most powerful, followed by the Zongshen Ryuka Fly 150 and with around 10 horsepower the Kawasaki D-Tracker 125 closes the gate.

Your closest Lifan dealer is in Maha SaraKham - telephone 043-791-281. No information about a Tiger dealer or Zongshen Ryuka dealer in Khon Kaen.

   

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By: news (offline)  Tuesday, 18 May 2010 @ 08:45 AM ICT  

Buying a second hand big bike like the Honda CB400 is something we cannot advice, most of this older big bike motorcycle have paperwork which have some degree of zig-zag or forgery involved.

Also buying motorcycles in Thailand which have a complete set of import and tax papers we can currently not recommend. In the last two months several exhaust emission rules are tightened, which makes it nearly impossible for a motorcycle like a early Honda CB400 to pass the Thai emission test.

   

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By: Anonymous: matty4u ()  Tuesday, 18 May 2010 @ 04:14 PM ICT  

Im not sure of the details of the New Thai emission laws, but in most countrys if u are licencing a bike or car then they must pass the emission rules of the year of manufacture i.e a 2000 model CB 400 must pass the emission rules that were in place in the year 2000. A new 2010 bike must pass the current emmisions laws.
I am not sure if this is the case in Thailand but how can anyone expect a bike built before 1995 to pass modern emission laws?

One question
I have read about ( GTrider ) the problems with licencing and green books of imported grey big bikes and that it can take 4 months or so to get the green book sorted.
If i purchase a NEW big bike in Thailand from say a Honda/Yamaha/Suzuki dealer. How long will the registration and green book process take. ???

If i purchase a New 125cc step thru bike in thailand from a dealer, how long does the licence and green book take to organise? Do these 125cc bikes need a green book?

any info much appreciated.
Matt...

By: news (offline)  Tuesday, 18 May 2010 @ 04:30 PM ICT  

Hi Matt,

If the motorcycle was imported into Thailand in 2000 and directly registered, yes it needed to comply with the rules in 2000. And as registered motorcycle it will remain valid until the end of the motorcycle, or you forget to pay road tax for three years (not paying road tax for 3-years, your motorcycle registration expires).

The problem is that people who imported a motorcycle back in 2000 (or other dates) and didn't registered the motorcycle, used it as what is called a invoice motorcycle. (no license plates only invoice and import papers to show the police when stopped).

When somebody currently is going to register that so-called invoice motorcycle, which was imported back in 2000 but never registered it needs to comply with the latest April 2010 revision of the exhaust emission rules.

Before April the Thai government was less strict on this emission rules.

   

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By: news (offline)  Tuesday, 18 May 2010 @ 04:41 PM ICT  

The time it takes to generate a greenbook depends a bit on where you live, in Bangkok it can take a day to a week – when busy it can take up to 2 weeks. Up country it can take a bit longer, some people report that they needed to wait 4 weeks before the greenbook arrived.

In Bangkok, if you plan to ride your motorcycle while waiting for the greenbook to arrive, it's highly recommended that you take a copy of the purchase papers and a business card of the shop you bought the motorcycle from with you. Depending on the mood of the police officer you need to pay 200 Baht for not having a legally required license plate or he lets you go with a smile.

Most up-country motorcycle dealers supply a temporary red-colored license plate, which is officially only valid during the day, riding on your motorcycle after 20:00 you can expect the same 200 Baht for not having a legally required license plate or just a smile and a warning...

   

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By: Anonymous: Anton ()  Tuesday, 18 May 2010 @ 04:42 PM ICT  

Thanks for all the great advice. I will definitely look into those models. There are a few good shops in the area, but I'm not above going to Sala Kham to find something decent.

Also, thanks for the tips about the emissions, I think if I stick with a new bike I should be ok.

By: Anonymous: Sly ()  Tuesday, 18 May 2010 @ 04:51 PM ICT  

The Yamaha Spark 135i is also a great machine and easily available in Thailand.

By: Matty (offline)  Wednesday, 19 May 2010 @ 08:00 PM ICT  

Big bike rego just seems like too much hassle and time consuming process, I would love to ship my 2008 CB600 hornet over to Thailand but that sounds like a nightmare process and very expensive too.
So i have decided that when i arrive in Thailand in 2 months time for a stay of 1 year, that i will buy a NEW bike under 250cc.
I have studied most of the models available in Thailand and in my opinion, considering performance and value is the Yamaha Spark 135i.

The Kawasaki KLX / Dtracker 250cc would be a great bike but its 3 times the price of the Spark135i
The Kawa Dtracker 125cc is nice too but its 34000 baht more expensive and only has 10hp where the Spark 135i has 16hp, thats 60% more power.
So i will be buying the Yamaha Spark 135i

Can anybody recommend an Honest , Reliable and Helpful YAMAHA Dealer? or tell me which Dealers to avoid?
Can be anywhere in Bangkok, or any major city in North East Thailand, I dont mind travelling to buy and wont be staying put in any one particular place so dont need the dealer to be "just around the corner"
Any suggestions or help apperciated.
Matt...

   

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By: news (offline)  Wednesday, 19 May 2010 @ 08:30 PM ICT  

If you just look for a motorcycle around 125 to 135cc the Yamaha Spark 135i is an excellent choice. The Spark is sporty, fuel-efficient, and remarkable easy to maintain. On fuel-injection technology the Yamaha is a bit simpler then the latest Honda PGM-FI, but that can also be seen as an advantage for Yamaha. Rural Yamaha dealers can still service your fuel-system without even understanding the basics of fuel-injection basics.

   

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By: silenzo (offline)  Monday, 27 January 2014 @ 11:23 PM ICT  

Quote by: news

The time it takes to generate a greenbook depends a bit on where you live, in Bangkok it can take a day to a week – when busy it can take up to 2 weeks. Up country it can take a bit longer, some people report that they needed to wait 4 weeks before the greenbook arrived.

In Bangkok, if you plan to ride your motorcycle while waiting for the greenbook to arrive, it's highly recommended that you take a copy of the purchase papers and a business card of the shop you bought the motorcycle from with you. Depending on the mood of the police officer you need to pay 200 Baht for not having a legally required license plate or he lets you go with a smile.

Most up-country motorcycle dealers supply a temporary red-colored license plate, which is officially only valid during the day, riding on your motorcycle after 20:00 you can expect the same 200 Baht for not having a legally required license plate or just a smile and a warning...



There's an offer from private seller (local people) a big bike without green book, but with invoice. Tax not paid as well, but he said it can be paid around THB14.000. Saw few in BKK people riding big bike without license and it seems free to go. Unless get caught by the police then your 200 baht story might happen. Is this always the case where by having invoice and let say we pay the tax, we can pay the fine to the police without having worry the bike will be confiscated by them? thanks.

   

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